There Were Calls Of ‘Bravo!’

audience

The screening on June 26:th opened with the film With Soul, With Blood by Rabih Mroué. In the film Mroué scans a grainy newspaper photograph of a massive crowd at a political protest in a futile effort to find any trace of his own presence at the event.

Next we screened two parts of a film made by Fia-Stina Sandlund, An Idealistic Attempt and Reconstruction Of An Action That Never Took Place. While planning a protest action together with Danish activist Ulla Roder, the artist asks herself to what extent she is prepared to take risks for the sake of ideals. When Ulla Roder gets arrested, the artist produces a reconstruction of the action that they had planned together: an opera performance with lyrics about Maersk McKinney Moller transporting arms.

While introducing this film, and talking about some earlier works of the artist, there were shouts of ‘Bravo!’ from the audience. Read more about these works at www.fiastinasandlund.se

film

The evening concluded with a slideshow of images by photographer Tod Seelie, who accompanied the streetartist Swoon and her allies while constructing and sailing their armada of rafts across the Adriatic Sea, from Slovenia to Venice, Italy. The work is called The Swimming Cities Of Serenissima. Read more about this work at www.swimmingcities.org

lights

On Rich And Poor Alike

The sun shines down On Rich And Poor Alike between May and September, as we engage in a longterm discussion on forms of commons together with  groups and projects like Trampolinhuset, Kuratorisk Aktion, Ensayos, Mustarinda Association, Sorfinnset Skole/The Nord Land and SIFAV. It’s all part of the exhibition project Communities in Conversation, at Konsthall C in Hokarangen (Stockholm). Our contribution has so far consisted in two parts, a slideshow and filmscreening on smallscale coalmining in Sweden during WWII, and a draft of a future exhibition contract between the Sunshine Socialist Cinema and hosting institutions.

The Sunshine Socialist Cinema is located in the countryside of Scania, an area which served as the Swedish coalmining district for several centuries. Originally, the coal was mined by only one corporation, Hoganasbolaget, but during WWII when Swedish imports were blocked, coal became scarce, and an exception was made: private persons were temporarily allowed to mine coal on land that they owned, in gardens and on farmland. These years, when 140 new shafts were dug, became known as the Klondyke period in Scania.

The Sunshine Socialist Cinema has started collecting photographs for a slideshow of images from the Klondyke period, and has also screened a section of the film Billesholm i helg och socken (1946), which shows some of the mines being worked by local farmers. We’ve received kind assistance from Billesholms Hembygdsforening.

In tandem with collecting material on the smallscale coalmines, we are also following the current process and debate around smallscale private production of solar energy, something which we ourselves are involved in. Together with Konsthall C, we’ve begun working out an approach to regulating our future involvement with art institutions who would wish to include the Sunshine Socialist Cinema in their programming. This involves mounting solar panels which could turn institutions into microproducers of their own electricity.

 

1

Two-part poster outlining an approach to exhibiting the Cinema in art institutions

(printed in soy based ink on a Riso)

In the Gothenburg Art Biennale

KuxaKanema_eng-1

Kuxa Kanema by Margarida Cardoso, 2003

During the opening weekend of the Gothenburg International Biennial of Contemporary Art, the Sunshine Socialist Cinema will present screenings of films on the deck of a boat by the Quay of Dreams in Gullbergsvass. The screenings are part of the section Art & Crime (curated by Joanna Warsza). On Saturday September 7th at 18.00 we’re showing Kuxa Kanema (Margarida Cardoso), and on Sunday September 8th at 19.00 we’re showing Handsworth Songs (Black Audio Film Collective). The screenings are parts one and two in a thematic series of four; the subsequent parts are shown in October.

KuxaKanema_eng-5

Kuxa Kanema by Margarida Cardoso, 2003

Kuxa Kanema is a documentary about how the People’s Republic of Mozambique, after declaring independence in 1975, started up a National Film Institute and began producing newsreels. The aim was to spread images and stories of how a Socialist nation was built by a unified people. Mobile outdoor cinemas would drive between towns and villages screening a new ten minute newsreel each week, the Kuxa Kanema. Kuxa Kanema means ‘birth of cinema’.

In 1991 Margarida Cardoso visits the ruin of the National Film Institute, a building partially destroyed by fire, where a few remaining employees are waiting for retirement. She starts copying what’s left of the newsreels onto videotape. She calls them “…visual documents that bear witness to the first eleven years of independence – the years of the socialist revolution”. Excerpts from the newsreels are mixed with interviews with former employees at the National Film Institute, who speak of the importance of cinema in giving form to their dreams and ideals.

Handsworth Songs 3

Handsworth Songs by Black Audio Film Collective, 1986

(Courtesy of Black Audio Film Collective and LUX, London)

On Sunday September 8th at 19.00 we’re screening Handsworth Songs, a film by Black Audio Film Collective. The film takes as its’ starting point the riots which occurred in Birmingham and London in 1985, and the way these events were portrayed in British media. In daily newspapers and TV the people involved in the riots can only be demonised or rationalised, not understood.

HANDSWORTH WOMAN_PRINT 2

Handsworth Songs by Black Audio Film Collective, 1986

(Courtesy of Black Audio Film Collective and LUX, London)

In Handsworth Songs the filmmakers explore a number of questions dealing with race, longing and belonging, going through decades worth of images. The format of the film attempts to mirror a multiplicity of black voices and positions in Britain, to show a heterogeneous black presence within the nation. The inclusion of older newsclips in the film builds up what the filmmakers have called “…an archive of black (un)belonging,  in the expression of hopes of belonging brutally deferred”.

van

Newsreels from the Gothenburg Commune, 2013

In the mobile screening unit of our cinema, we will present newly produced ten minute Newsreels from the Gothenburg Commune each week throughout the fall. The films have been recorded by a group of artists, filmmakers, and media activists, some of whom have a background in Indymedia Gothenburg. More info about these films will follow shortly!

Best Audience Ever

IMG_4434

Some got angry at the films, some got stiff from the cold…

IMG_4433

…but the debate got really good at times. Thank you everyone for coming.

Parts of the discussion concerning Tomorrow is recapitulated in the review written by Emil Schön in HD.

(link)

The discussion on Pirate is not documented anywhere, but in the latest article the interviewer Joel Winqvist keeps returning to copyright issues, provoked in part by our screening of Annika Larssons’ film and in part by our story of an outdoor cinema in Buenos Aires showing pirated films for free.

IMG_4905

From ad paper Lokaltidningen

Small Improvements

We’re getting ready for this years’ first outdoor screening in our original location, the village of Höja in southern Sweden. It takes place on Sunday July 14 between 21.00-23.00. We’ll be showing the video Pirate by Annika Larsson followed by a documentary on the art-activist group Voina, Tomorrow by Andrey Gryazev. In the garden there’ll be posters from Formfront on display. We’ll be back with more info on these films shortly, plus some weather forecasts.

Meanwhile, some improvements made to the stationary setup since last year:

support beams

Diagonal supports for eliminating traces of wobbliness in the bleachers. And:

extra panels

Two extra solar panels, giving us a total of 720 Watts per hour under optimal conditions. Enough for the projector and our new soundsystem.